The small town of Dartmoor knows that few things exemplify a spirit of egalitarianism and irreverence like an ANZAC-themed public dunny.  So it built one.

Smack bang in the centre of town, the loo is covered with plaques and military insignia, and flanked by a row of carved trees commemorating the experiences of townspeople in the First World War.

The trees were planted in 1918 to memorialise local service men and women, and subsequently cut and carved in 1998 (complete with matching wood-carved “public toilets” sign) to attract more public toilet bloggers to the town.

The pained expression on the figure directly out front of the dunny recalls the hellish trench warfare on the Western Front, or (for those of us lucky enough to have avoided the horrors of war) the raw after-effects of a dodgy beef vindaloo.

There’s a “donation pole” nearby for the upkeep of the carvings. If you’re ever passing through, we strongly suggest you pop in and spend a penny, because Dartmoor has got it spot on with this combo of history, local character, and everyday memorialisation.


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